From the TUC

The Arculus Review: cutting employment rights?

13 May 2009, by in Working Life

The Tory commissioned Arculus Review: Enabling Enterprise, Encouraging Responsibility is due to be published today, and will apparently tell us how Government can save £100bn plus by cutting regulation. Full analysis of the gems it will certainly contain (and the likely lack of analysis as to the economic benefits that regulation brings) when it arrives – Richard Murphy has already made some educated guesses.

A taster is provided by the BCC’s “Business Burdens Barometer“, which features regulatory costs including £100m for tax credits, £27m for providing part-time workers with the same rights as their full-time colleagues, £53m for flexible working rights, £165m for the Child Trust Fund and £13m for regulation regarding the control of asbestos at work. Concerningly, the BCC estimate of the cost (no benefits are featured) of these irritating employment rights is only three quarters of the amount the Arculus Review is proposing could be cut.

3 Responses to The Arculus Review: cutting employment rights?

  1. Robert Day
    Jun 6th 2009, 11:09 pm

    This is named for the author, David Arculus, right? The David Arculus who was Chairman of Severn Trent Water? The company that the water regulator Ofwat fined £35 million last year for falsifying its regulatory data returns to them and which is still under investigation on that case by the Serious Fraud Office?

  2. Nicola Smith

    Nicola
    Jun 10th 2009, 12:10 pm

    Yes Robert, the report was produced by Sir David Arculus and can now be downloaded from here: http://www.conservatives.com/News/News_stories/2009/05/Businesses_need_better_not_more_regulation.aspx

  3. Robert Day
    Jun 18th 2009, 12:06 am

    My question was rhetorical; I already knew the answer. Indeed, I’ve embarassed unwitting victims from the Better Regulation Task Force with that one! My point is that David Arculus was one of the key proponents of ‘arm’s-length regulation’ but is implicated, at least by association, with a company that was prepared to falsify regulatory returns for financial gain. In my book, ‘Light touch regulation’ is a euphemism for corporate corruption. Come the Revolution, Comrades…..