From the TUC

214,000 reasons why people in London can’t find work

05 Oct 2010, by in Labour market, Society & Welfare

Chris Grayling has just told the Conservative party conference that there is ‘no reason for people in London to claim that they can not find employment’. In fact, there are 214,293 people claiming JSA in London at the moment, while only 37,513 vacancies are being advertised across the London Jobcentre Plus network. The ratio of notified jobs to JSA claimants is 1:6. The reason that there are unemployed people in London is that there is not enough work for them to do.

11 Responses to 214,000 reasons why people in London can’t find work

  1. Tweets that mention 214,000 reasons why people in London can’t find work | ToUChstone blog: A public policy blog from the TUC — Topsy.com
    Oct 5th 2010, 3:32 pm

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  2. The Squeeze
    Oct 5th 2010, 7:46 pm

    Come on, who seriously looks for jobs (or advertises jobs) at the Job Centre, everyone knows it’s pants.

  3. Tax Research UK » The Tories really believe that unemployment is a choice
    Oct 6th 2010, 9:20 am

    […] the TUC note, Chris Grayling told the Conservative party conference yesterday that there is ‘no reason for […]

  4. Tim Worstall
    Oct 6th 2010, 12:02 pm

    You might want to try those numbers again:

    In 2002, the Office of National Statistics (ONS) estimated that only 44 per cent of all job vacancies are advertised through Jobcentre Plus.

    http://www.fsb.org.uk/policy/assets/fsb%20report%20-%20reform%20the%20job%20centre.pdf

    And of course, if there’s 80 odd thousand jobs and 210,000 unemployed then we do seem to have 80 odd thousand of those unemployed not doing the jobs which are available.

  5. Nicola Smith

    Nicola
    Oct 6th 2010, 5:30 pm

    Tim,

    But the claimant count is not the best measure of unemployment (I used it as the only regional vacancy data available is vacancies notified to JCP, and JSA claimants were therefore a fairer comparison than the better ILO measure) – in fact there are close to 2,500,000 people unemployed in this country, plus another 2,300,000 people who are economically inactive but want a job (not to mention the 2,800,000 people who are in work but want more hours). The national vacancy survey shows that there are 467,000 vacancies across the UK – when you compare all vacancies with all people who are out of work with all jobs the ratios are therefore same or worse than in my post.

    And of course there isn’t a precise match between the vacancies available and the locations and skills of jobseekers. For example, many of the 61,000 health and social work vacancies will only be open to people with health and social work qualifications.

    Best
    Nicola

  6. Tim Worstall
    Oct 6th 2010, 5:36 pm

    “And of course there isn’t a precise match between the vacancies available and the locations and skills of jobseekers.”

    Excellent, so we do have structural unemployment then, not just cyclical.

    “in fact there are close to 2,500,000 people unemployed in this country, plus another 2,300,000 people who are economically inactive but want a job (not to mention the 2,800,000 people who are in work but want more hours).”

    And as I never tire of pointing out, economicsw does not permit a mismatch between supply and demand. It only allows a mismatch between supply and demand at a particular price. If the quantity of labour being offered for supply is so much larger than the quantity of labour being demanded at that price then the price is too high, isn’t it?

    Wages are clearly above market clearing levels and should thus fall.

    Quite simple, really, isn’t it?

  7. Nicola Smith

    Nicola
    Oct 6th 2010, 5:38 pm

    Tim,

    Does that mean that you accept that people are unemployed because there aren’t enough jobs?

    Best
    Nic

  8. Tim Worstall
    Oct 6th 2010, 5:45 pm

    “at current prices”

  9. Labour market weakness continues – while help for long-term unemployed is cut | Left Foot Forward
    Oct 13th 2010, 12:26 pm

    […] claimants could move into work tomorrow, and Chris Grayling’s assessment that there is “no reason for anyone in London to claim they cannot find employment” the reality is that there are now […]

  10. H, London
    Nov 28th 2010, 10:07 am

    I am in London, unemployed for 6 months having been bullied out of work. At the job centre several staff have told me that is the case for most people signing on. I was on a one year contract and for that reason had no right to claim constructive dismissal. Almost all employers have asked me for a reference from my last line manager – in my case, the person who bullied me.

    I have worked in the charity sector for 12 years. I finished school at 17 and although I recently funded my own year out and paid to study a Masters degree in a bid to avoid unemployment, I have been unable to get any other kind of work.

    I have a physical impairment which means I cannot do the work I used to do, but I am now trained to do other (similar) work.

    I have been told I do not have the right experience. so I worked for nothing for 6 months, but was physically and financially unable to keep doing this and although I had been promised it, it did not result in any paid work.

    Agencies will not take me on to do administrative jobs, nor will agencies take me on to do the social and political research I am trained to do, the reason: I do not have an undergraduate degree. This is true, but the real reason after some pestering: we have no work and too many people looking for work on our books already, you do not fit the standard mould so you have no chance.

    I am physically unable to do much physical labour or jobs that require me to stand for long periods. However, according to the government I am not incapacitated as the problems I face are not on their list.

    So I am still unemployed, but have no desire to be out of work or on benefits of any kind. Nor am I able to work in the plethora of unpaid internships which may help me to get into a real job one day. I have spent the last 6 months continually filling out lengthy application forms and seeking work. Most of the work available is temporary and part time and I have applied for it anyway, even though I want full time permanent work.

    I am horrified at having Tory + pseudo Tory mistaken analysis of the labour market in the driving seat over the next several years. I genuinely think that they are unable to understand what non-privileged people experience, as they themselves have never lived it and don’t recognise how much the old boy network gives them an advantage, especially in hard times.

    I hope the TUC will be ensuring real people’s stories are in the public domain and key politicians’ in-trays, to demonstrate the life changing flaws in this government’s policies.

  11. Nicola Smith

    Nicola
    Nov 29th 2010, 3:10 pm

    Dear H

    Thanks for your comments. We will be looking to highlight people’s experiences in the months ahead – many thanks for sharing yours. You may also be interested in the False Economy website which will be launching soon and will provide another opportunity for people to share their experiences of Government cuts: http://falseeconomy.org.uk/

    All the best
    Nicola