From the TUC

Abolition of EMAs – costly and unfair

18 Jan 2011, by in Society & Welfare

The debate on Educational Maintenance Allowances called for by the Parliamentary Labour Party seems to have focused politicians’ attention on the government’s harsh plans to get rid of EMAs. I’m particularly proud of the way unions, working with students, have led the way in campaigning against this policy and today we saw two pieces of union research that showed just how damaging this move will be. UNISON revealed that cancelling the contract with Capita to run the scheme will cost up to £40 million in penalty charges. At the same time, a poll commissioned by the University and College Union has shown that 70 per cent of students who get EMAs would drop out without this backing. The government claims to believe in social mobility, fairness and equal opportunities – all of these causes will be harmed by cancelling the EMAs.

The debate on Educational Maintenance Allowances called for by the Parliamentary Labour Party seems to have focused politicians’ attention on the g

The debate on Educational Maintenance Allowances called for by the Parliamentary Labour Party seems to have focused politicians’ attention on the government’s harsh plans to get rid of EMAs. I’m particularly proud of the way unions, working with students, have led the way in campaigning against this policy and today we saw two pieces of union research that showed just how damaging this move will be. UNISON revealed that cancelling the contract with Capita to run the scheme will cost up to £40 million in penalty charges. At the same time, a poll commissioned by the University and College Union has shown that 70 per cent of students who get EMAs would drop out without this backing. The government claims to believe in social mobility, fairness and equal opportunities – all of these causes will be harmed by cancelling the EMAs.

overnment’s harsh plans to get rid of EMAs. I’m particularly proud of the way unions, working with students, have led the way in campaigning against this policy and today we saw two pieces of union research that showed just how damaging this move will be. UNISON revealed that cancelling the contract with Capita to run the scheme will cost up to £40 million in penalty charges. At the same time, a poll commissioned by the University and College Union has shown that 70 per cent of students who get EMAs would drop out without this backing. The government claims to believe in social mobility, fairness and equal opportunities – all of these causes will be harmed by cancelling the EMAs.

2 Responses to Abolition of EMAs – costly and unfair

  1. Jenny Saxelby
    Jan 18th 2011, 9:23 pm

    BALDERDASH. Young people should value the education they are offered, which is free until age 18. Children in developing countries would give their right arms for such a priviledge. They appreciate that education is the way out of the poverty trap and those with ambition and drive will do their utmost to attend school, apply themselves and achieve. Our children already have a head start. They should study and work hard for their own self respect and for the benefits which come with being employable. Knowledge is power. Bribery is corruption.

  2. R. Migres
    Jan 19th 2011, 12:44 am

    POPPY umm petals.
    If education in the developing world as has been described operated with the same reverance attributed to the UK’s then there would over time be an identical environment in which to argue the case to support student’s future economic success. How hard was it for you to scorn annonymous learners commitment to their study? I imagine as ever it is the cost inflicted by an outsourcing, consultancy organisation rather than direct payments that are the issue here.