From the TUC

Another Liberal Democrat principle discarded: Nick Clegg abandons Robin Hood

11 Nov, by in Politics

This week Nick Clegg fell into line yet again behind a right-wing economic policy, endorsing George Osborne’s rejection of a Robin Hood Tax. The Liberal Democrat manifesto in 2010, which put “fair taxes” at the top of four policies on the front page pledged to

work with other countries to establish new sources of development financing, including bringing forward urgent proposals for a financial transaction tax

Nick Clegg himself had gone on record in February, just two months earlier, saying of the Robin Hood Tax (six minutes in):

It’s a great idea in theory….We should push for it internationally. I’m glad to see it now finally being considered by IMF and other international bodies. But aiming for the best which would be a Tobin tax across the world shouldn’t prevent us doing something now here at home.

Now, instead, he is telling the EU to forget a Robin Hood Tax, echoing everything George Osborne has said. We would welcome him back in Sherwood Forest whenever he decides to abandon his new rich friends in the City and return to backing the poor.

 

6 Responses to Another Liberal Democrat principle discarded: Nick Clegg abandons Robin Hood

  1. John
    Nov 12th 2011, 12:29 am

    Based on these comments there is now only one word to describe Clegg – ”Judas”!

  2. Rowland Hill
    Nov 12th 2011, 6:45 pm

    Another Lib Dem principle discarded. That’s a contradiction in terms as they don’t appear to have any.

  3. Ian
    Nov 13th 2011, 10:33 am

    Which specific page of the manifesto is it on, I can’t find it even with searching for keyword matches.

  4. Owen Tudor

    Owen Tudor
    Nov 13th 2011, 11:26 am

    Ian, it’s on page 62

  5. stewart wilson
    Nov 13th 2011, 10:54 pm

    I am afraid I disliked your comment on Nick Clegg apparently retreating on the idea of a Robin Hood tax being implemented. To point out that such a tax was an idea set out in the Liberal Democrats manifesto 2010 is very misleading because I think its very fair to say ‘the goal-posts changed’ massively when Nick Clegg entered Number 10 to form a Coalition Government.

    The Libdems have only 57 MPs while the Tories have 207,so its obviously not a clear cut case that Mr Clegg should deliver everything he said he would prior to the General Election.

    Did Clegg not also approve of the idea ‘in theory’ only??

    ‘But aiming for the best which would be a Tobin tax across the world shouldn’t prevent us doing something now here at home.’ is another quote from your article that compromised it’s integrity.

    Until the Libdems increase their number of MPs, hideous frustration like this will be common place for Nick Clegg. Reports like yours just make things that little bit more unpalatable.

    Yours

    Stewart Wilson

  6. Owen Tudor

    Owen Tudor
    Nov 13th 2011, 11:30 pm

    Stewart, I think you misconstrue what Nick Clegg has said. He hasn’t said “I support the idea of a Robin Hood Tax, but the majority of the coalition government don’t, so I’m honour-bound, having entered a coalition, to abide by that view.” That’s the sort of thing people in coalitions say all over the world all the time. Instead, what Nick Clegg has done is simply abandon yet another policy he either put forward to gain votes, or deeply believed in (I’m not sure which would be worse.)

    No attempt to weasel out of manifesto pledges by retrospectively claiming they were only ‘in theory’ – as if some pledges were made with his fingers crossed behind his back – can obscure the fact that he’s now showing his true colours as an economic liberal, unwilling to intervene on the side of the people against big finance.

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