From the TUC

British employers turn to atypical employment

06 Jan 2012, by in Labour market

There’s an interesting turn of affairs in the Eurostat data for employment that I hadn’t noticed before today. Across Europe, the proportion of workers who work in part-time jobs has increased; this has also been observable in the UK, but to a lesser extent:

The same European trend is visible if we confine ourselves to the period since the start of the recession. But the increase since the start of 2008 has been more marked in the United Kingdom:

There’s an even stronger contrast if we look at temporary employment. If we look at the last 14 years, the proportion of workers in temporary employment has actually fallen in the UK, but risen in Europe as a whole:

But if we just look at the period since the start of the recession, this pattern is reversed:

This country still has a high(ish) employment rate by European standards (see below) but these figures suggest part of the price workers have paid to maintain that position.

European employment rates

  • Iceland 79.7
  • Switzerland 79.4
  • Norway 75.2
  • Netherlands 74.7
  • Sweden 74.5
  • Denmark 73.5
  • Germany 72.5
  • Austria 72.1
  • Finland 70.1
  • United Kingdom 69.4
  • Cyprus 69.0
  • Czech Republic 65.7
  • Portugal 64.8
  • Slovenia 64.4
  • Estonia 64.3
  • France 64.1
  • Luxembourg 63.8
  • Belgium 62.5
  • Latvia 61.4
  • Lithuania 60.8
  • Poland 59.7
  • Slovakia 59.6
  • Ireland 59.5
  • Romania 58.8
  • Spain 58.3
  • Bulgaria 58.2
  • Italy 57.3
  • Malta 57.3
  • Greece 56.4
  • Hungary 55.8
  • Croatia 52.3
  • Turkey 49.2
  • Macedonia 43.7