From the TUC

Economics (page 2)

The poison politics of failed deficit reduction

08 Jul 2015, by in Economics

Five years ago, the Chancellor set out policies to bring the public finances back under control. On the basis of any definition, these policies failed. Deficit reduction proceeded greatly slower than planned; public sector debt rose even higher than expected on the plans he inherited from Labour, and on international definitions remains effectively at the…

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Not a workers’ budget

08 Jul 2015, by in Economics

Massive and unfair cuts in tax credits and benefits are going to hit low-paid workers. Can the Chancellor hope to justify his claim that this is a “one nation Budget”? The key to any Budget is how it answers the question who gains and who loses?  The big picture is explained well in the latest…

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Born in the 90s? Then this Budget is not for you

08 Jul 2015, by in Economics

“This is a one nation Budget,” announced the Chancellor in his introduction to today’s Budget, before announcing reforms that exclude under 25s from higher pay and 18-21 year olds from housing benefit, scrapping maintenance grants for students, and permitting elite (“high-quality teaching”) Universities to increase tuition fees. The TUC of course welcomes the government move…

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Summer Budget 2015 has little to say on industrial policy

08 Jul 2015, by in Economics

The headlines from today’s Budget are pretty clear to see: the National Living Wage, an apprenticeship levy for large employers, a further squeeze on benefits. There is little to say on industrial policy and whilst today’s Budget can be viewed as a statement about big themes, concerns that the government is quietly ditching the cross…

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One London: under the coalition, the capital’s economy moved even further from the rest of the UK

06 Jul 2015, by in Economics

As the government’s flagship regional initiative seemingly flounders under the failings of investment in the railways and ahead of potential Budget announcements, it is worth reviewing just how far the regional reality is from the rhetoric. For over the period of the coalition, London moved even further away at an even faster pace (for GDP,…

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