From the TUC

Is #Brexit Britain at the front of the queue for a US trade deal, or the end of the line?

Owen Tudor

14 Mar 2017, by in International

When Prime Minister Theresa May visited newly inaugurated US President Donald Trump in January, Brexit supporters were cock-a-hoop about how post-Brexit Britain would be at the front of the queue for a trade deal with the US Trade Representative (USTR – not that there was one when Mrs May went to Washington – indeed Trump’s pick still hasn’t been confirmed). This…




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#Brexit bad news hidden in #Budget2017

Owen Tudor

13 Mar 2017, by in International

Last week’s Budget speech by the Chancellor had very little to say about Brexit. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a Brexit angle – you just have to look at what wasn’t there, rather than what was. First, there was very little in the Budget to prepare for the challenges Brexit will pose to the British economy.…




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Government risking ‘leap in the dark’ with no deal

Owen Tudor

12 Mar 2017, by in International

The Government’s much-touted negotiating threat that ‘no deal would be better than a bad deal’ risks doing huge damage to the UK economy, our jobs, rights at work and living standards. Last week the all-party Commons Select Committee on International Trade made clear that ‘no deal’ was in fact the worst ‘bad deal’ on offer. Today…




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Precarious work – the union experience

Helen Nadin

10 Mar 2017, by in Labour market

What is insecure work and has it increased? This blog examines precarious or insecure work, how it manifests itself in the workplace and whether insecure work practices have increased. Insecure work includes: agency work or seasonal, casual, temporary work people on zero-hours contracts and low-paid self-employed workers. Recent TUC research has found that insecure work has increased…




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Did #Budget2017 deliver for public services?

Matt Dykes

08 Mar 2017, by in Public services

This blog takes a look at what this Budget delivered for social care, health and education. In our pre-Budget blog we looked at what the Budget needed to deliver for public services, creaking after almost a decade of austerity. Social Care Few could deny the intensifying crisis in social care. Cuts of over 9 per…




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#Budget2017: Boost for technical skills funding

Iain Murray

08 Mar 2017, by in Economics

As with much of the Budget, the package of skills measures contained few surprises as the various announcements had been trailed extensively beforehand. Nevertheless, there is much to welcome in the Budget on technical education and skills, in particular the commitment to step up funding for the rollout of the new qualification system (or “T…




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#Budget2017: Self-employment tax changes

Kate Bell

08 Mar 2017, by in Economics

Increases in taxation of self-employment may raise more money for the exchequer but will do little to clamp down on bad employers who force staff into bogus self-employment to lower their tax bill Today’s standout Budget measure was the increase in the tax paid by the self-employed, with the rate of the Class 4 National…




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#Budget2017: Zero out of four

Geoff Tily

08 Mar 2017, by in Economics

Yesterday we set the Chancellor four tests for whether his Budget would deliver for working people. Today we have no good news to report. This wasn’t a budget for living standards, it didn’t give the British economy the investment it needs to see us through the uncertainty of Brexit, and public services remain under severe…




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